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Archive for February 2012

Kamloops Seedy Saturday this Saturday

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Copied from eatkamloops.org

The Friends of the New Victory Garden and Master Gardeners invite you to Seedy Saturday. Seedy Saturday is a local event to exchange seeds and enjoy free gardening seminars. Bring your saved seeds or leftover packaged seeds. If you do not have any seeds, don’t worry. There are plenty available for everyone!

Date: Saturday, February 25, 2012
Where: Sahali Centre Mall, ‪22 – 945 Columbia Street West‬, Kamloops, BC
Time: 9:30am to 1:30pm
Contact: Sally Andrysiak 250.573.3163 or Fawn Know 250.579.5768
Cost: $2.00 admission charge. Donations to the Food Bank appreciated.

Schedule of Free Gardening Seminars:
9:45am-10:15am
Pollinators: Why Keep Bees presented by Kamloops Bee Keepers
10:25am-10:55am
Planting Your First Vegetable Garden presented by Dianna Chalmers
11:05am-11:35am
Square Foot Gardening presented by Anneimeke Neufeld, Master Gardener
11:45am-12:15pm
Planting Your First Vegetable Garden presented by Dianna Chalmers
12:25pm-12:55pm
Pollinators: Why Keep Bees presented by Kamloops Bee Keepers
13:05pm-13:35pm
Square Foot Gardening presented by Brenda Sanden, Master Gardener

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Written by larkinschmiedl

February 22, 2012 at 1:13 pm

Organic produce coming to TRU

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A new source of food will be coming to students on campus at Thompson Rivers University this September.

The students’ union (TRUSU) is looking to start providing a “good food box,” coming hopefully from local organic producer Thistle Farm, for students who’d like to buy local and organic right on campus throughout the school year.

Food boxes are a common way local organic food is distributed throughout communities, as a convenient alternative to the farmer’s market and grocery stores. The boxes are usually delivered to a customer’s home or to a central pick-up location.

TRUSU would like campus to become that location.

Nathan Lane, executive director of TRUSU, said TRUSU is looking at installing refrigeration facilities in order to store the food, and perhaps to store fresh food like carrots for the food bank as well.

The food boxes would be sold at cost.

Lane said the students’ union is set on providing food boxes starting in September, and the only contingency is confirmation of a contract with Thistle Farm.

Thistle Farm provides weekly boxes to around 100 customers locally, and an additional 50 bi-weekly.

The boxes come in different sizes with the small providing enough produce and fruit for one person for a week.

Deb Kellogg, co-owner of Thistle Farm, said the boxes contain 100 per cent locally-grown organic vegetables in the summer, alongside some fruit from the Okanagan and some imported tropical fruit. In the winter, the boxes are one-third locally grown.

Customers can choose whether they want a box of produce, fruit, or a mix of the two.

A small box goes for $20.

“Can organic feed the world?”

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Check out this two-minute video.

Micael Pollan is a journalist who studies the food system.

Written by larkinschmiedl

February 16, 2012 at 10:01 am

The Omnivore’s Dilemma

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“What is perhaps most troubling, and sad, about industrial eating is how thoroughly it obscures all these relationships and connections. To go from the chicken (Gallus gallus) to the Chicken McNugget is to leave this world in a journey of forgetting that could hardly be more costly, not only in terms of the animal’s pain but in our pleasure, too. But forgetting, or not knowing in the first place, is what the industrial food chain is all about, the principal reason it is so opaque, for if we could see what lies on the far side of the increasingly high walls of our industrial agriculture, we would surely change the way we eat.
“Eating is an agricultural act,” as Wendell Berry famously said. It is also an ecological act, and a political act, too. Though much has been done to obscure this simple fact, how and what we eat determines to a great extent the use we make of the world–and what is to become it. To eat with a fuller consciousness of all that is at stake might sound like a burden, but in practice few things in life can afford quite as much satisfaction. By comparison, the pleasures of eating industrially, which is to say eating in ignorance, are fleeting. Many people today seem perfectly content at the end of an industrial food chain, without a thought in the world; this book is probably not for them. There are things in it that will ruin their appetites. But in the end this is a book that is about the pleasures of eating, the kinds of pleasures that are only deepened by knowing.”

– Michael Pollan

Written by larkinschmiedl

February 10, 2012 at 1:21 pm

Food-involved folks gather and make things happen at the Kamloops Food Policy Council

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Kamloops Food Bank. Photo by Larkin Schmiedl.

They were gathered around a long table up a long flight of stairs on the second floor of the Kamloops Food Bank building.  The Kamloops Food Policy Council (KFPC) is a group of keen food-involved folks from a wide range of organizations and backrounds, with common visions to promote the strength of the local food system.

Each of the KFPC’s members comes from a particular place, and in that place, they are each making food localization a concrete reality, in all different ways.

The KFPC is where they come to collaborate, check in and connect.

Ed Walker is starting a revolution among chefs in Kamloops.  He is the chair of the school of culinary arts at Thompson Rivers University (TRU), and is also the founder of the Thompson-Shuswap Chef Farmer Collaborative.

The collaborative was started to link local chefs with local farmers–and as the best chefs know, the most delicious, quality ingredients come fresh, local and well-grown.  Walker said he wants to make it easier for local food to get into local restaurants.

The Chef Farmer Collaborative was started in just 2010, and has grown exponentially.  It is a non-profit, and to date boasts over 70 members, both farmers and chefs.

The Collaborative is modelled after the Island Chefs Collaborative started by David Mincey and based in Victoria, B.C.

At the Thompson-Shuswap Collaborative’s annual general meeting (AGM) coming up Feb. 12, it will be announcing its newest program–a non-profit loan system that will be available to offer no-interest loans to folks interested in starting up projects or with good ideas for increasing the productivity of an existing one.  The loans will be available to businesses, whereas the already-existing grants are available to non-profits.

The AGM takes place at the Culinary Arts building on TRU’s campus at 10 a.m.

Walker said he hopes to ultimately see chapters of chef-farmer collaboratives all over Canada.

***

On the Culinary Arts building’s roof, there are animals.  Hive animals.  Walker’s colleague, another faculty member in the culinary arts program, is beekeeping up there.  He took a course and learned how to do it, and set up the apiary sometime last year.  More on this in upcoming blog entries, so stay tuned.

Culinary Arts is also trying to get a garden in front of its building, to grow produce for use in cooking.

***

The Kamloops Food Policy Council’s AGM is also coming up; March 1 at 6 p.m. at the Henry Grube Centre, their AGM will be a potluck and meeting, and will be themed “Public Produce.”

Elaine Sedgman, a member of the group, will be speaking about edible landscapes in schools.  She said she hopes school gardens can become a more common feature in Kamloops.  She said Alice Waters’ Edible Schoolyard Project garden in Berkeley, California is one of her inspirations.

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In terms of edible landscaping here in Kamloops, there is a push to have more streetscape plants be edibles.

The Public Produce Garden here in town, built and first planted this past summer, is also going to be moving to the North Shore in summer 2012.

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One very interesting new local project is the Kamloops Community Food System of 1948 mapping project.  Check out their website.  The group is presently reaching out to schoolteachers in hopes that their maps and resources can be used in classrooms when complete.

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Another new local project that’s just gotten funding is Thompson-Shuswap Food Connections.  This group is looking to link institutional buyers such as the hospital, the University and the prison with local farmers.

Stage two of the project is planned to be a look at local processing facilities.

***

Kamloops Seedy Saturday is an annual seed-swapping and workshop event that is happening Feb. 25 this year.  More details to come on this.

Seedy Saturday is a Canada-wide event taking place in many communities.  The idea is for gardeners to get together to share different seed varieties, especially but not limited to those bred and grown locally.

***

There is a new community garden in Kamloops called the Wilson House garden.

The organizers of the garden recently received a TD Canada Trust “Friends of the Environment” grant to finish construction (which mostly meant buying the soil to put in the already-built garden).

All other community garden plots in Kamloops are booked for the 2012 summer season.  There are a few left available at Wilson House.

Here is a map with contact numbers for the community garden plots in Kamloops.

***

Thanks for reading, and please come back for more information weekly.

Larkin

Cultural food in comparison

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There are a really amazing series of photos you should check out that showcase what a ‘typical’ family from all different parts of the world eats.  They’re beautiful and very educational.

What the World Eats Part I

What the World Eats Part II

Which diet would you like best?

And if you’re interested in the more scientific side of diet, this article talks about how we came to have the Western diet we have today.

Pre- and Post-Agricultural Diets, from The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition:

Origins and evolution of the Western diet: health implications for the 21st century

Written by larkinschmiedl

February 1, 2012 at 10:05 pm

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